Wednesday, July 6, 2016

Onomastic sessions at the International Medieval Congress 2016



International Medieval Congress 2016

4-7 July 2016

The main programme has been finalised, and can be viewed through the links below. Anyone registering or actively involved in the programme will be sent a hard copy of the IMC 2016 Programme.



IMC 2016 Session

Session1706
TitleInto the Words?: Linguistic Approaches to Letters, Texts, and Place-Names
Date/TimeThursday 7 July 2016: 14.15-15.45
 
OrganiserIMC Programming Committee
 
Moderator/ChairAlaric Hall, School of English, University of Leeds
 
Paper 1706-aSolving a Salty Mystery: Finding Ala Chocha
(Language: English)
Kathleen Tyson, Department of History, King's College London
Index Terms: Charters and Diplomatics; Geography and Settlement Studies; Local History; Maritime and Naval Studies
Paper 1706-b'Men drynken ofte peyne and gret distresse': Emotion and Drinking Imagery in Troilus and Criseyde
(Language: English)
Blythe Hsing-Wen Tsai, School of English, University of Leeds / Department of Foreign Languages & Literature, National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan
Index Terms: Language and Literature - Middle English; Mentalities; Rhetoric
Paper 1706-cThe Roles of Religious Expressions in the Paston Letters , with or without a Relative Clause
(Language: English)
Osamu Ohara, Department of English, Jikei University School of Medicine, Tokyo
Index Terms: Computing in Medieval Studies; Gender Studies; Language and Literature - Middle English; Lay Piety
 
AbstractPaper -a:
In the Acta of William the Conqueror is a 1086 notification of plea for contested lands and privileges at Steyning. The king, clerics and barons convened at Ala Chocha, which is said to be a manor of William d’Eu. There is no place with this name in any other English or Norman record, but the grand assembly implies a prosperous manor. The name is not obviously Saxon, Celtic, Norman, Frankish, or Danish. As for Latin, ala can mean wing, but chocha is unknown. Following the mystery of Ala Chocha led to the 100 salt-pans of Rye in Rameslie, Sussex, and may have discovered a connection between salty slang in 1086 and salty slang in 2016.

Paper -b:
The imagery of drinking in Chaucer's Troilus and Criseyde is unique in that it traces the trajectory of emotional suffering in a way absent from Chaucer’s Italian sources. Troilus refers to his desire for Criseyde as quenchless thirst (I.406); only by drinking pain and distress can he be cured of lovesickness (III.1213-16). Likewise, when Criseyde speaks of women weeping, she uses the image of drinking sorrow (II.784). This paper explores how the poem connects drinking imagery and the discourse of emotion; it compares the language of emotion in Troilus and Criseyde with the forms deployed in late-medieval affective piety in a hope to better appreciate Chaucer’s deep concern with the physiology of emotion.

Paper -c:
In the Paston Letters, the religious expressions such as 'by the grace of God' seem to have been used so carelessly that they are sometimes thought to have been mere stereotyped expressions which lost their literal meaning. However, when Edmond II wrote, '[…] as I shall inform you at my coming, which shall be on Wednesday next, by the grace of God, who preserve you, […]' the sentence showed not only his gladness of returning on Wednesday but also his love and respect for his brother. Here, the religious expression with a relative clause was certainly used as a comment clause. In this paper, I would like to examine the Paston Letters and try to put these religious expressions in order according to their roles in the sentence.


IMC 2016 Session

Session624
TitleProductive Ground: Place-Names and the Landscapes of Food Provision
Date/TimeTuesday 5 July 2016: 11.15-12.45
 
SponsorInstitute for Name-Studies, University of Nottingham
 
OrganiserJohn Baker, Institute for Name-Studies, University of Nottingham
 
Moderator/ChairJayne Carroll, Institute for Name-Studies, University of Nottingham
 
Paper 624-aThe Seasoned Traveller: Place-Name Evidence for Medieval Salt Transport
(Language: English)
Eleanor Rye, Institute for Name-Studies, University of Nottingham
Index Terms: Economics - Trade; Language and Literature - Old English; Onomastics
Paper 624-bField-Names, Food, and Farming Practices in Medieval Nottinghamshire
(Language: English)
Rebecca Gregory, Institute for Name-Studies, University of Nottingham
Index Terms: Language and Literature - Middle English; Language and Literature - Scandinavian; Onomastics
Paper 624-cA Balanced Diet?: Evidence for Hunting, Gathering, and Farming in Shropshire Place-Names
(Language: English)
John Baker, Institute for Name-Studies, University of Nottingham
Index Terms: Language and Literature - Old English; Onomastics
 
AbstractMedieval food production and its associated activities and industries have left a significant linguistic legacy in the English landscape, in the form of place-names. These contain numerous references to animal husbandry, crop cultivation, and so on; to a very considerable degree, field-names reflect the agricultural concerns and farming practices of predominantly rural communities; and England's medieval infrastructure, parts of which are best studied through onomastic research, must partly be a response to the movement of food and livestock. This session explores ways in which place- and field-names across the Midlands can help us identify and characterise different elements in the chain of food production and supply.



IMC 2016 Session

Session1037
TitleVisions of Community, I: What's in a Name? - Ethnonyms and Identity in Early Medieval Eurasia
Date/TimeWednesday 6 July 2016: 09.00-10.30
 
SponsorSonderforschungsbereich 42 'Visions of Community', Universität Wien / DOC-Team ‘Ethnonyme im Vergleich’ / Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien
 
OrganiserOdile Kommer, Institut für Sozialanthropologie, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien
Salvatore Liccardo, Institut für Mittelalterforschung, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien
 
Moderator/ChairHelmut Reimitz, Department of History, Princeton University
 
Paper 1037-aSetting Boundaries: 'Barbaric' Ethnonyms between Geography and Imperial Ideology
(Language: English)
Salvatore Liccardo, Institut für Mittelalterforschung, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien
Index Terms: Geography and Settlement Studies; Historiography - Medieval; Mentalities; Rhetoric
Paper 1037-bLabel or Libel?: The Ethnonym 'Saxo' in the Latin Textual Record, 300-900
(Language: English)
Robert Flierman, Afdeling Geschiedenis, Radboud Universiteit Nijmegen
Index Terms: Historiography - Medieval; Language and Literature - Latin
Paper 1037-cTurks as Eurasian Nomads in Medieval Islamic Sources
(Language: English)
Zsuzsanna Zsidai, Institute of History, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest
Index Terms: Historiography - Medieval; Islamic and Arabic Studies
 
AbstractEthnonym - i.e. names applied to ethnic groups - contain a plethora of meanings that go far beyond the seeming neutral appellation of 'Franks', 'Goths', or even 'Romans'. This means that ethnonyms are not only interesting terms in their own right, since they suggest a wide variety of ways to represent groups in relation to their land or language, but they also serve as constructing devices in cultural discourse. Drawing upon case studies from the Late Roman period until the 10th century and from both Latin and Arabic perspectives the speakers will address ethnonyms as conceptual tools, which have been used to adapt, shape or enforce particular ideas of communities and specific political agendas. It will shed new light on the way ethnonyms function as cognitive strategies in order to make sense of both the 'Self' and the 'Other'. Following a debate on how ethnonyms can function, on a wider level, as elements of Late Roman and Early Medieval 'sense of place' and imperial rhetoric, the session will later concentrate on literary and political implications of two specific ethnonyms: 'Saxons' and 'Turks'.

IMC 2016 Session

Session1237
TitleA Feast of Names, I: Place Names and Multiculturalism
Date/TimeWednesday 6 July 2016: 14.15-15.45
 
SponsorDictionary of Medieval Names from European Sources
 
OrganiserSara L. Uckelman, Institute of Medieval & Early Modern Studies, Durham University
 
Moderator/ChairJames Chetwood, Department of History, University of Sheffield
 
Paper 1237-aMedieval Place Names of Ecclesiastical Reference: A Cross-Cultural Approach
(Language: English)
Andrea Bölcskei, Institute of Hungarian Linguistic, Literary & Cultural Studies, Károli Gáspár Református Egyetem, Budapest
Index Terms: Language and Literature - Other; Onomastics
Paper 1237-bA Frisian Place Name on the Southwestern Norwegian Coast and Its Relationship to Old Norse bákn and Old Frisian bāken
(Language: English)
Andrea Maini, Independent Scholar, Vegårshei
Index Terms: Language and Literature - Dutch; Onomastics
Paper 1237-cSiculo-Arabic Toponyms in the Book of Roger
(Language: English)
Katherine Jacka, Department of Arabic Language & Cultures, University of Sydney
Index Terms: Language and Literature - Italian; Onomastics
Paper 1237-dAbout the Different Hydronymic Layers of the Multilingual Hungary in the Middle Ages
(Language: English)
Erzsébet Győrffy, Department of Hungarian Linguistics, Debreceni Egyetem
 
AbstractMany onomastic studies focus on a single time and place, providing a detailed linguistic and social analysis of the names from a narrow data set. While there is no doubt these studies provide valuable information, in this session we seek to move from the meagre diet afforded by a narrow, monocultural approach to the full feast offered when multicultural aspects of names are considered. This session looks at the influence of multiple cultures on the evolution of given names on and off the continent.


IMC 2016 Session

Session1337
TitleA Feast of Names, II: Contact of Cultures and the Evolution of Given Names
Date/TimeWednesday 6 July 2016: 16.30-18.00
 
SponsorDictionary of Medieval Names from European Sources
 
OrganiserSara L. Uckelman, Institute of Medieval & Early Modern Studies, Durham University
 
Moderator/ChairDrew Shiel, National Institute for Digital Learning, Dublin City University
 
Paper 1337-aYou Can Call Me Al-Cuin: A Re-Evaluation of Medieval English Personal Naming, 900-1100
(Language: English)
James Chetwood, Department of History, University of Sheffield
Index Terms: Language and Literature - Old English; Onomastics
Paper 1337-bA Typology of Contact Phenomena in Medieval Personal Names
(Language: English)
Mariann Slíz, Institute of Hungarian Linguistics & Finno-Ugric Studies, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest
Index Terms: Language and Literature - Other; Onomastics
Paper 1337-cÞá hálgan: An Etymological and Cross-Linguistic Analysis of Anthroponyms
(Language: English)
Serena Martinolich, Scuola di Lingua e Cultura Italiana per Stranieri, Università degli Studi di Genova
Index Terms: Language and Literature - Old English; Onomastics
 
Abstract











Many onomastic studies focus on a single time and place, providing a detailed linguistic and social analysis of the names from a narrow data set. While there is no doubt that these studies provide valuable information, in this session we seek to move from the meagre diet afforded by a narrow, monocultural approach to the full feast offered when multicultural aspects of names are considered. This session looks at the influence of multiple cultures on the evolution of given names on and off the continent.